Medical Information


Understanding Chronic Kidney Disease

Kidneys perform several functions to keep the body healthy. These functions include:
-Removing waste from the blood
-Balancing the fluids in the body
-Producing hormones that regulate blood pressure, aid the production of red blood cells, and maintain the calcium balance, which keeps bones healthy

Kidneys perform several functions to keep the body healthy. These functions include: -Wastes and fluids to blood
-Increased blood pressure
-Anemia (an abnormally low red blood cell count)
-weakening of the bones
-more rapid loss of remaining kidney function

Patients may experience:
-Fatigue
-nausea
-lack of appetite
-loss of energy

When these problems are diagnosed and treated, the patient’s condition will usually improve.

Guidelines for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

Guidelines for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease < Managing Fatigiue >

-Pace yourself and take several short rest periods throughout the day
-Take part in light exercise, such as walking, to help reduce fatigue
-Eat a well balanced diet with plenty of fluids (unless limited by your doctor)
-Eat small, frequent meals or snacks

Fatigue can also be a result of anemia. Talk to your doctor about ways to bring your red blood cell count back to normal levels.

< Diet and Nutriton >

-Low Protein Diet – On a low protein diet, the kidneys do not need to work as hard. Because this may help prolong kidney function, patients with kidney disease are often advised to eat a diet low in protein.
-Low Calorie Diet – Kidney disease patients who are overweight and have high blood pressure are often encouraged to eat a low-calorie diet to lose weight and help control blood pressure. Reducing salt intake can also help control high blood pressure.

< Exercise >

Regular exercise can help improve your overall health and well-being in addition to helping control high blood pressure and maintaining strength. Ask your doctor about an exercise program that would be right for you.

< Managing Kidney Related Bone Disease >

Kidney diseases may cause an imbalance between calcium and phosphorus in the body. Because of this imbalance, patients with kidney disease often experience bone disease. Your doctor may prescribe an active form of vitamin D called calcitrol, as well as calcium supplements, to help maintain healthy bones. Sometimes phosphate binders containing calcium are required.
Hypertension and Kidney
High blood pressure (also called “hypertension”) is a condition that can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys act like a filtering system to get rid of excess water and wastes in the blood. Blood pressure is the force, or pressure, of the blood on the walls of your blood vessels. Over time, high blood pressure can damage the blood vessels and nephrons (filtering units) in the kidneys. Damaged nephrons can’t do their job of filtering out all of the wastes, sodium, and excess fluids from your blood. The excess fluid and sodium that stays in your bloodstream puts extra pressure on the walls of your blood vessels, further raising your blood pressure. In turn, this extra pressure leads to further kidney damage. Diabetes and Kidney.
Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney problems (also called “renal insufficiency” or “kidney disease”) in the United States. High blood sugar levels from poorly controlled diabetes damage the blood vessels and nephrons of the kidneys. When your kidneys are functioning properly, the glomeruli (blood filtering units of the kidneys) keep protein inside the body. These proteins are necessary to keep a person healthy. High blood sugar can damage the kidney’s glomeruli. When the kidneys cannot properly clean out waste and extra fluids, not enough waste and fluids leave the body as urine. Instead, they build up in your blood, which can cause further damage to your kidneys. Kidney Disease and Anemia.
If you have developed kidney problems as a result of high blood pressure, you may be feeling fatigued. You may find it hard to do some of your normal daily tasks or activities. If so, please talk to your doctor. A constant feeling of tiredness can be a sign that you have developed a condition known as anemia, where your body does not have enough red blood cells. This may be because damaged kidneys may not be producing the erythropoietin your body needs to stimulate the production of red blood cells. This means your body is not receiving the oxygen it needs to run efficiently, leading you to experience symptoms of anemia.
Detecting and Treating Anemia If you are experiencing any symptoms of anemia, talk to your doctor or nurse. He or she can perform a blood test, or complete count (CBC), to determine whether or not you are anemic. If you are anemic as a result of high blood pressure and/or problems with your kidneys, ask your healthcare provider about Epo shot to treat your anemia. Treating your anemia will increase your red blood cells and help you feel more energetic.

Hypertension and Kidney

How does high blood pressure damage kidneys?

-High blood pressure (also called “hypertension”) is a condition that can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys act like a filtering system to get rid of excess water and wastes in the blood.

Blood pressure is the force, or pressure, or pressure, of the blood on the walls of your blood vessels. Over time, high blood pressure can damage the blood vessels and nephrons (filtering units) in the kidneys. The damaged nephrons can’t do their job of filtering out all of the wastes, sodium and excess fluids from your blood. The excess fluid and sodium that stays in your bloodstream puts extra pressure on the walls of your blood vessels raising your blood pressure even more. This extra pressure leads to further kidney damage.

Diabetes and Kidney

How does high sugar from diabetes damage kidneys?

Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney problems (also called “renal insufficiency” or “kidney disease”) in the United States. High blood sugar levels from poorly controlled diabetes damage the blood vessels and nephrons (filtering units) of the kidneys. When your kidneys are functioning properly, the glomeruli (blood filtering units of the kidneys) keep protein inside the body. Your body needs this protein to stay healthy. High blood sugar can damage the kidney’s glomeruli. When the kidneys don’t do a good job of cleaning out waste and extra fluids so not enough waste and fluids go out of the body as urine. Instead, they build up in your blood which can cause even further damage to your kidneys.

Kidney Disease and Anemia

If you have developed kidney problems as a result of high blood pressure, you may be feeling fatigued or really tired. You may find it hard to do some of your normal daily tasks or activities. If this is the case, it’s time to talks to your doctor. A constant feeling of tiredness can be a sign that you have developed a condition known as anemia. Anemia is a condition in which your body does not have enough red blood cells. If your kidneys are damaged, they may not be producing the erythropoietin your body needs to stimulate the production of red blood cell. This means your body is not receiving the oxygen it needs to run efficiently. Without enough oxygen, you may experience symptoms of anemia, such as fatigue.

Detecting and Treating Anemia
If you are experiencing any symptoms of anemia, be sure to tell your doctor or nurse. He or she can perform a blood test, or complete count (CBC), to determine whether or not you ate anemic. If you are anemic as a result of having high blood pressure and/or problems with your kidneys, ask your healthcare provider about Epo shot to treat your anemia. Treating your anemia will increase your red blood cells and help you feet more energetic and less tired.

Helpful Links

www.aakp.org
(Anemican association of Kidney Patients)

www.kidneyfund.org
(American Kidney Funds)

www.lifeoptions.org

www.nkdep.nih.gov
(National Kidney Foundation)

www.kidneyclub.net
(For Korean Kidney Patients)






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